Archives for posts with tag: vintage record player

My latest before and after project was salvaging this old, dilapidated Victrola.  It was really in rough shape – deep cracks, missing a door, broken hinges. But, the label on the bottom said it was made in 1924, so I could not resist trying to salvage it!

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Step one was cleaning the entire piece (it had many, many years of “I’ve been sitting in a garage” grime).

My good carpenter friend helped make a new right door and found a vintage hinge online that would fit.  Once the new door was in place, I realized that I wouldn’t be able to just sand a restain it – the cracks on the body of the piece were too deep, and I wouldn’t be able to easily color match a new door.  So, I opted for paint and moved forward with priming the piece. I chose a gorgeous gray paint and accented with bronze metallic paint (from Martha Stewart’s line at Home Depot). Added new hardware, reconnected the crank, and voila! A gorgeous record cabinet!  Plus, as a bonus, the turntable actually still works. I imagine some industrious person could find a new needle and actually make it play.  Currently, I am selling this piece for $375. More information at www.facebook.com/encorefurnishingsnashville.

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Apparently I have a thing for vintage record player cabinets. This is my second record cabinet makeover in recent days (see the first), and I am as much in love with this one as the last. I found this Mid Century style record console that had been gutted on Craigslist and picked it up immediately.

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It is solid wood, and was in fairly good condition. Except it was FILTHY. Truly one of the more disgusting pieces I have found. Exhibit A:

cabinetbefore

So, I busted out the DL hand cleaner (aka the best furniture cleaner in existence) and spent a solid two hours scrubbing and sanding. I have found that when I am planning to paint a piece, I will typically use the DL and then spend as much time sanding, first with 120-grit to really get the finish off, then with 320 to smooth the edges.

I removed the hardware, pulled the doors out and primed the piece with Gripper primer in grey, then I began to paint.  I wanted to minimize brush strokes for a smooth finish, so I used a small, dense foam roller brush and satin finish paint in Martha Stewart’s “Wrought Iron” (which is the same color I used on the last record cabinet. I am clearly obsessed with this deep grey-blue).  Then, after I had painted three coats in the Wrought Iron, I taped the legs and painted just the feet in a metallic gold paint (Martha Stewart specialty finishes – Vintage Gold). I was inspired by several Mid Century pieces that have metal sheathings on the feet:

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Back to the console…I finished the feet and then used the gold with a tiny brush to highlight the vertical lines in the front of the piece. And, I’m pretty happy with it! I put this baby up for sale on Etsy, as there is sadly no room for it in my house. Check it out: https://www.etsy.com/listing/126303051/mid-century-record-console-media-cabinet

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So, I found this gem on the Craigslist and just KNEW I had to have it. So, I dragged my friend Gor with me to meet the seller at (I kid you not) a truck stop north of town. It was slightly scary, but 100% worth it.photo(21)photo(20)

When I got it home, it was fairly disgusting. Covered in dust and things I don’t really care to identify. When I’m tackling a serious cleaning project like this, I like to use DL Hand Cleaner. This magic potion is my mother’s secret trick for getting rid of years of grime from furniture. I have no idea where to buy it except via Amazon. Trust me, this is the best $12.46 you will ever spend. After about two hours it was ready to prime and paint.

Primed Record Cabinet

Primed with Gripper.

Fabric removed and first coat of paint!

Fabric removed and first coat of paint!

I opted for a dark blue from Martha Stewart – Wrought Iron, and I found a great replacement fabric in a green/blue tweed. I’m so proud of the results! I had to add a shelf to the record player side, and I decided to use my leftover fabric to cover the shelf. It’s a happy little surprise when you open the lid 🙂

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